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Tips To Keep Your Pet Safe From Going Missing On July 4th

Around the Fourth of July, more pets go missing from their homes than any other time of year. Shelters and animal control officials report a 30-60% increase in lost pets from July 4-6th. When frightened by fireworks, cats and dogs sometimes flee in attempts to escape the unknown danger. They can also slip away when the front door opens for party guests. You can keep your pet from becoming a statistic this holiday with our Fourth of July pet safety tips.

Keep Your Pets Inside
Even a pet that normally stays within the boundaries of your property may flee when fireworks start to go off in your neighborhood or at nearby parks. Pets do not understand where the booms are coming from, and may feel as though they’re in danger. They may dig under fences, break free of tethers, or even tear down gates to escape.

Consider Celebrating At Home
If it’s your pet’s first Independence Day, it may make sense to forgo parties and outings on the Fourth of July and through the following weekend. You can alternate with other members of your household, ensuring that at least one person is home with your pet during the holiday festivities.

Keep in mind that if you relocated in the past year, you may not realize that your new neighborhood is close to a park that hosts a fireworks display, or that your new neighbors set off fireworks in the street.

Also, some pets experience increased anxiety with age. Senior cats and dogs that suffer from dementia commonly experience “sundowning” or increased symptoms in the evenings. So, a pet that once didn’t mind fireworks can develop noise anxiety later in life.

Make Sure Your Pet’s ID Is Up-To-Date
Your pet should wear a collar tag that’s inscribed with your address and phone number. If they’re found without their collar, their microchip can be scanned at a shelter or vet’s office. Both forms of identification should be up-to-date to ensure you can be contacted once your pet is found.

Your Pet’s Firework Free Zone
Cats and dogs have an acute sense of hearing that’s thousands of times more sensitive than ours, and they’re also able to pick up on sounds at higher frequencies. So, even when they’re safe indoors, they may get spooked by nearby booms.

It can be helpful to create a little nest indoors for your pet. A separate room, crate, or gated off area is ideal, especially if you’re expecting guests or food deliveries. Surround your pet with soft blankets, toys, and other comfort items. You can also drown out the noise by playing calming music.

There are many over-the-counter anxiety relief products and calming treats for pets that can help your dog or cat relax. If you’re having trouble managing even with home remedies, your veterinarian can prescribe anxiety medication to help your pet stay safe and relaxed.

July Is Lost Pet Prevention Month
Many pets get lost in the summertime, not just on the Fourth of July. They may spend more time outside, and unexpected thunderstorms can give them just as much of a scare as a firework boom. Keep your pets safe every day of the year with physical boundaries, supervision, an up-to-date microchip and collar ID tags.