Ask the Vet
Ask the Vet
Michael Dym, V.M.D.
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
Dr. Michael Dym
Back to results
Enter Your Information All fields are required

While efforts are made to answer all questions as quickly as possible, if an immediate answer is required or if your pet is in need of urgent or emergency care, contact your pet's veterinarian immediately.

*Please note: Questions submitted and the answers will appear on our website as a benefit to all pet owners. Please make sure not to include any personal information in the box where you enter your question.

Ask the Vet
Michael Dym, V.M.D.
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
Dr. Michael Dym
Thank you! Your question has been submitted.

You will receive an answer from Dr. Dym and our vet/tech team as soon as possible, usually the same day.

All answers are provided for informational or educational purposes only, and are intended to be a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise and professional judgment of your pet's veterinarian.

It may be necessary to consult your pet's veterinarian regarding the applicability of any opinions or recommendations with respect to your pet's symptoms or medical condition.

Close
Ask the Vet
Michael Dym, V.M.D.
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
Dr. Michael Dym
Oops! Your question has not been submitted.

An error has occurred, please reload the page and try again.

Close
Ask the Vet
Michael Dym, V.M.D.
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
Dr. Michael Dym
Got questions? Ask Dr. Dym & our Vet Team:

While efforts are made to answer all questions as quickly as possible, if an immediate answer is required or if your pet is in need of urgent or emergency care, contact your pet's veterinarian immediately.

Do these answer your question?
Showing of | See All
Have another question, or can’t find your answer?
Submit your question
We're Sorry!

There is no answer related to your question

Can’t find your answer?
Submit your question
Category

Healthy Treats For Horses

Whether you want to motivate your horse to learn new skills or just want to strengthen your bond, treats are the quickest way to a horse’s heart. You can even use treats to help your horse learn to tolerate a potentially scary new experience, like trailering. Choose wholesome treats for your horse to give them a tasty, well-deserved reward without putting their health at risk.

Healthy Treats For Horses
Many fruits and veggies can be used as tasty, healthy treats. Apples and carrots are popular favorites. Keep in mind that many fruits and veggies are high in natural sugars and a diet rich in produce can lead to high blood glucose levels.
An excess of glucose in the blood causes the pancreas to produce more insulin. Over time, the horse can develop insulin resistance, which is linked to complications like equine metabolic syndrome and recurring laminitis.
Celery is a great option that’s low in sugar and high in fiber and many vitamins and minerals. It can be given whole or chopped to prevent choking if your horse tends to eat quickly. Horses can also eat the leaves at the top of the celery stalk.
Bananas are another popular treat for horses. They’re great for giving before physical activity as a pre-workout snack, as the extra potassium helps prevent muscle fatigue. Bananas can be given whole, skin-on, or may be chopped.
Homemade treats like Stud Muffins, usually made with molasses, oats, and carrots, are a great occasional snack. The molasses acts as a quick source of energy, while the fiber in oats offer long-lasting energy, making them great for active horses.
Naturally, sugar cubes and candies like peppermints and candy canes are high in glucose. One or two small bites are unlikely to harm a horse that does not have any chronic health issues, but a piece of fruit would be a healthier way to satisfy your horse’s sweet tooth.

Treats To Avoid
Seeds and pits can be a choking hazard for horses. If you choose to give cherries or peaches, always remove the pits before feeding.
Nightshade vegetables, including potatoes, tomatoes, adn eggplant, are toxic to horses.
Bread, donuts, and baked goods may be a treat for us, but for horses, the doughy texture can lead to impaction colic.
Ask your veterinarian before introducing any treats to your horse’s diet if they have a chronic condition like Cushing’s disease or Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP).