Acepromazine

5 out of 5 Customer Rating
Acepromazine is rated 4.1 out of 5 by 87.
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prod10209 product detail number 1.0
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Acepromazine

5 out of 5 Customer Rating
Acepromazine is rated 4.1 out of 5 by 87.
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Reviews

Rated 1 out of 5 by from Torture Want to know how effective this outdated, cruel drug is? Super effective at completely reducing your pet to a quivering, slobbering, neurotic mess, incapable of providing any comfort. We are looking for something to help calm, relax our pets... hopefully something akin to valium, ativan where we as humans feel calm. This is NOTHING LIKE THAT. Your pet pal still feels/ experiences the same fear, anxiety, panic, doom as before. Only now they are glued in place, still freaking out. Cruel, inhumane. People writing good reviews for this crap probably only relieved they don't have to actually deal with the problem, just throw a sedative at it! Google this drug and inform yourselves! There are LOTS of other options out there!! One star reviews may not tell the entire story
Date published: 2020-07-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Anxiety attacks stopped This is miracle pill for my 6 year old lab. He gets very nervous around loud noises (gunshots, fireworks, thunder etc.) When a thunderstorm is approaching I give him a pill about 20 to 30 minute's before it arrives. It amazingly calm him.
Date published: 2020-05-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Helped with his anxiety After loosing his sight, my 16 year old rat terrier had severe anxiety issues, and this drug really helped him sleep through the night.
Date published: 2020-03-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Love them I have a3 yr old great dane with very high anxiety. The dr gave me some of these pills and wow what a big difference. He was so mellow . I dont give him them all the time. But these are amazing.
Date published: 2020-02-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Pet travel Needed a tranquilizer for my dog and the vet didn’t have any. I called pet meds and they sent it to me on time.
Date published: 2020-01-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Saved the Day! My beautiful rescued Great Dane is very scared and trebly during storms I’ve tried all kinds of things to make her feel safe and sound. None have worked. So pet Meds to the rescue! They were able to fill her prescription quickly and reasonably so that now during rainy season she can rest comfortably! Thank you.
Date published: 2019-10-04
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Ace I purchased this because of the storms and the 4th of July. My GSD suffers from EXTREME noise anxiety. I felt guilty giving it to her bc she looked so out of it. I cut back the suggested does tremendously and it worked great!
Date published: 2019-07-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from acepromozine I purchased this a month ago as my dog is afraid of fireworks and thunderstorms..It worked like a charm..I highly recommend it to anyone who has similar issues.
Date published: 2019-06-13
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Questions

Hi, are the 10 mg tablets scored for splitting? and do you need a prescription for this med. Thanks

Asked by: Susan
Thank you for your question. Yes , this medication is scored. This medication does require a prescription. Once you place your order our Pharmacy will contact your veterinarian directly for the prescription.
Answered by: Crystal RPTechnician
Date published: 2020-07-31

Can I give my dog Acepromazine along with tramadol, gabapentin and famotidine?

Asked by: Dee Dee
Thank you for your question. Several of these drugs can cause drowsiness. Check with your DVM before administering them concurrently.
Answered by: Crystal RPTechnician
Date published: 2020-06-23

How much do I need for a 15lb cat?

Asked by: Thunder
We do suggest speaking with your vet due to this has to be prescribed.
Answered by: Shari PetMed Pro
Date published: 2020-06-04

I have a SUPER hyperactive 9 month old, 8 pound Chihuahua Mix. I cant take her to clip her nails without her nearly drawing blood from either myself or the groomer. Can i give her this medication to calm her down enough to get through the nail clipping?

Asked by: AMA20
That is exactly what my dog was prescribed this medication. However, he has no under lying medical conditions that would be pre-emptive or contradictory for him to have it. A quick call to my vet explaining my dogs extreme excited was just seeing the nail clippers was all I had to do for my vet to prescribe it. He did suggest I do a trial run first to see how my dog reacted to it first as it can cause aggression in some dogs.
Answered by: BeaB
Date published: 2020-06-17

If drug expired in 2012, is it still safe to give? Got prescription for 4th of July for anxiety so only use a couple of days a year

Asked by: Maria
Your expired tablets are safe to give your dog, but you may notice that they are not as effective as they used to be. Given that however, most, but not all, medications break down very little (<10%) in the first 10 years after expiration. Just be sure that you don't give your pet "extra" if you notice it is not very effective.
Answered by: BeaB
Date published: 2020-05-16

I gave my 4 year old husky a 25mg acepromazine and now his eyes is now covered by half a later of skin what does this mean should I be worried he is trying to play but very wabbly I am a bit concerned someone please ease my mind

Asked by: Jess15
This sounds like my dog after having this medication. It "relaxes" your dog and that includes his muscles. It sounds like his under eyelids (dogs basically have 2 sets) are droopy because of the tranquilizing effect of this medication. It has the effect of turning their bodies into jello. Although it doesn't sound like he's having a negative reaction (sounds like he's reacting exactly as intended), if you have a regular vet or know the vet who prescribed this, please reach out to them if only to ease your mind. This medication's effects generally last 4 to 6 hours if given the proper dose which is 0.25 - 1.0mg per pound. The tablets come in 10mg and 25mg. One 10mg tablet would be used for a dog between 10lbs (at 1mg/lb) up to 40lbs (at 0.25mg/lb). One 25mg would be used between 25lbs (at 1mg/lb) up to 100lbs (at 0.25mg/lb). It would be unusual for a dog to experience a serious overdose with negative lasting effects from the medication. Although my reply is a bit late, I hope this helps if someone else finds themselves in a similar situation. It also sounds like the dose your husky received is definitely within the dosing guidelines.
Answered by: BeaB
Date published: 2020-06-29

I would like to use my dog's Ace to put my cat to sleep. She is 15 yrs old and in bad shape. I worked as a vet tech for 5 yrs but can't remember if it can be given IV. Or how much to give, if given IM?

Asked by: Frannie
Oh please have a mobile vet come to your house if it's time to put her down. . If you try to do it yourself and things don't go well, she may suffer terribly until you can get her to a vet. Don't do that!! There are horror stories online.
Answered by: BeaB
Date published: 2020-05-16

What would happen if a human persom took this. Medicine

Asked by: Meow
This is NOT a narcotic medication and it is not addictive and tolerance does not increase. I'm assuming that is why you've asked.
Answered by: BeaB
Date published: 2020-05-16
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What is Acepromazine?

Acepromazine is a phenothiazine tranquilizer that is used prior to anesthesia and surgery because of its sedative effects and its ability to prevent vomiting. It's also used as an aid in controlling excited animals during examinations, treatments, and grooming. Acepromazine is sold per tablet and requires a prescription from your veterinarian.

For:

Cats and Dogs

Benefits:

  • An effective tranquilizer
  • Controls overly excitable animals
  • Can prevent vomiting post surgery
  • Sold affordably per tablet

How does acepromazine work?

Acepromazine is classified as a phenothiazine neuroleptic, which means it modifies the chemicals in your pets brain to change their behavior. Its a tranquilizer that depresses the central nervous system. The mechanism of action is not exactly known, however, its thought to block receptors of dopamine in the brain, a chemical used for cell-to-cell communication.

Cautions:

Tell your veterinarian if your pet has liver disease, heart disease, seizure disorders or if the pet is pregnant or lactating. Also mention other CNS medications, such as Phenobarbital, that your pet may be taking.

Brand Name:

Aceproject (Vetus), Aceprotabs (Vetus), PromAce (Fort Dodge)

Generic Name:

acepromazine (ace PRO ma zeen)

What is the most important information I should know about acepromazine:

Acepromazine is a prescription medicine FDA approved for veterinary use in dogs only; however it is a commonly accepted practice for veterinarians to use acepromazine in cats. Acepromazine is available as 10 mg and 25 mg tablets. Each tablet is quarter scored. The usual dose for dogs and cats is 0.25-1 mg/lb. Acepromazine may color the urine pink. Occasionally, this medication may have an opposite effect causing stimulation, therefore this medication should not be used to treat aggression.

What should I discuss with my veterinarian before giving acepromazine to my pet?

Tell your veterinarian if your pet has liver disease, heart disease, seizure disorders, or if the pet is pregnant or lactating. You should also mention other CNS (Central Nervous System) medications such as clomipramine, fluoxetine, and Reconcile or monoamine oxidase inhibitors such as Anipryl, Selegiline, or Preventic Collar that you are giving or using on your pet.

How should acepromazine be given?

Give acepromazine exactly as directed by your veterinarian. Acepromazine should be given 45 minutes to 1 hour prior to the procedure for the medication to take effect. If you do not understand the directions ask the pharmacist or veterinarian to explain them to you.

What are the potential side effects of acepromazine?

Stop giving acepromazine and seek emergency veterinary medical care in the event of rare allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; hives). Other, less serious side effects that have been reported but may resolve with continued treatment. Continue to give acepromazine and notify your veterinarian if your pet shows signs of sedation, depression, incoordination, low blood pressure, slower heart rate and breathing. Other side effects may also occur. Talk to your veterinarian about any side effect that seems unusual or bothersome to your pet.

What happens if I miss giving a dose of acepromazine?

Give the missed dose as soon as you remember during the same day. However, if you don't remember until the next day, skip the dose you missed and give only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not give a double dose of the medication.

What happens if I overdose my pet on acepromazine?

Seek emergency veterinary medical treatment. Symptoms of overdose may include excess drowsiness, slow heart rate and breathing, unsteady movement, unconsciousness, low blood pressure or seizures.

What should I avoid while giving acepromazine to my pet?

Do not give your pet epinephrine or CNS depressant medications such as Phenobarbital.

What other drugs will affect acepromazine?

Before giving acepromazine, tell your veterinarian if your pet is being given phenytoin, antiarrhythmics such as quinidine and beta blockers such as propranolol. Antidiarrheal medications and antacids may reduce the effectiveness of acepromazine.

Acepromazine Directions:

  • Acepromazine is a prescription tranquilizer use by veterinarians in dogs and cats.
  • Acepromazine is typically used prior to anesthesia and surgery because of its sedative effects and because it can prevent vomiting.
  • It is also used as an aid in controlling excited animals during examination, treatment, and grooming.
Tip:

Acepromazine may color the urine pink. Occasionally, this medication may have an opposite effect causing stimulation; therefore this medication should not be used to treat aggression.

Acepromazine Dosage:

Acepromazine Dosage for Cats
Weight Dosage
All weights Give 0.25-1 mg/lb of pet's body weight by mouth. Should be given 45 minutes to 1 hour prior to the procedure
Acepromazine Dosage for Dogs
Weight Dosage
All weights Give 0.25-1 mg/lb of pet's body weight by mouth. Should be given 45 minutes to 1 hour prior to the procedure
Acepromazine Dosage for Horses
Horses
Do not use!

Storage:

Should be stored at room temperature. Keep away from moisture and heat.

Acepromazine Ingredients:

Acepromazine 10 mg Tablets
Active Ingredient (per tablet) Amount
Acepromazine Maleate 10 mg
Acepromazine 25 mg Tablets
Active Ingredient (per tablet) Amount
Acepromazine Maleate 25 mg

What is Acepromazine?

Acepromazine is a phenothiazine tranquilizer that is used prior to anesthesia and surgery because of its sedative effects and its ability to prevent vomiting. It's also used as an aid in controlling excited animals during examinations, treatments, and grooming. Acepromazine is sold per tablet and requires a prescription from your veterinarian.

For:

Cats and Dogs

Benefits:

  • An effective tranquilizer
  • Controls overly excitable animals
  • Can prevent vomiting post surgery
  • Sold affordably per tablet

How does acepromazine work?

Acepromazine is classified as a phenothiazine neuroleptic, which means it modifies the chemicals in your pets brain to change their behavior. Its a tranquilizer that depresses the central nervous system. The mechanism of action is not exactly known, however, its thought to block receptors of dopamine in the brain, a chemical used for cell-to-cell communication.

Cautions:

Tell your veterinarian if your pet has liver disease, heart disease, seizure disorders or if the pet is pregnant or lactating. Also mention other CNS medications, such as Phenobarbital, that your pet may be taking.

Brand Name:

Aceproject (Vetus), Aceprotabs (Vetus), PromAce (Fort Dodge)

Generic Name:

acepromazine (ace PRO ma zeen)

What is the most important information I should know about acepromazine:

Acepromazine is a prescription medicine FDA approved for veterinary use in dogs only; however it is a commonly accepted practice for veterinarians to use acepromazine in cats. Acepromazine is available as 10 mg and 25 mg tablets. Each tablet is quarter scored. The usual dose for dogs and cats is 0.25-1 mg/lb. Acepromazine may color the urine pink. Occasionally, this medication may have an opposite effect causing stimulation, therefore this medication should not be used to treat aggression.

What should I discuss with my veterinarian before giving acepromazine to my pet?

Tell your veterinarian if your pet has liver disease, heart disease, seizure disorders, or if the pet is pregnant or lactating. You should also mention other CNS (Central Nervous System) medications such as clomipramine, fluoxetine, and Reconcile or monoamine oxidase inhibitors such as Anipryl, Selegiline, or Preventic Collar that you are giving or using on your pet.

How should acepromazine be given?

Give acepromazine exactly as directed by your veterinarian. Acepromazine should be given 45 minutes to 1 hour prior to the procedure for the medication to take effect. If you do not understand the directions ask the pharmacist or veterinarian to explain them to you.

What are the potential side effects of acepromazine?

Stop giving acepromazine and seek emergency veterinary medical care in the event of rare allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; hives). Other, less serious side effects that have been reported but may resolve with continued treatment. Continue to give acepromazine and notify your veterinarian if your pet shows signs of sedation, depression, incoordination, low blood pressure, slower heart rate and breathing. Other side effects may also occur. Talk to your veterinarian about any side effect that seems unusual or bothersome to your pet.

What happens if I miss giving a dose of acepromazine?

Give the missed dose as soon as you remember during the same day. However, if you don't remember until the next day, skip the dose you missed and give only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not give a double dose of the medication.

What happens if I overdose my pet on acepromazine?

Seek emergency veterinary medical treatment. Symptoms of overdose may include excess drowsiness, slow heart rate and breathing, unsteady movement, unconsciousness, low blood pressure or seizures.

What should I avoid while giving acepromazine to my pet?

Do not give your pet epinephrine or CNS depressant medications such as Phenobarbital.

What other drugs will affect acepromazine?

Before giving acepromazine, tell your veterinarian if your pet is being given phenytoin, antiarrhythmics such as quinidine and beta blockers such as propranolol. Antidiarrheal medications and antacids may reduce the effectiveness of acepromazine.

Acepromazine Directions:

  • Acepromazine is a prescription tranquilizer use by veterinarians in dogs and cats.
  • Acepromazine is typically used prior to anesthesia and surgery because of its sedative effects and because it can prevent vomiting.
  • It is also used as an aid in controlling excited animals during examination, treatment, and grooming.
Tip:

Acepromazine may color the urine pink. Occasionally, this medication may have an opposite effect causing stimulation; therefore this medication should not be used to treat aggression.

Acepromazine Dosage:

Acepromazine Dosage for Cats
Weight Dosage
All weights Give 0.25-1 mg/lb of pet's body weight by mouth. Should be given 45 minutes to 1 hour prior to the procedure
Acepromazine Dosage for Dogs
Weight Dosage
All weights Give 0.25-1 mg/lb of pet's body weight by mouth. Should be given 45 minutes to 1 hour prior to the procedure
Acepromazine Dosage for Horses
Horses
Do not use!

Storage:

Should be stored at room temperature. Keep away from moisture and heat.

Acepromazine Ingredients:

Acepromazine 10 mg Tablets
Active Ingredient (per tablet) Amount
Acepromazine Maleate 10 mg
Acepromazine 25 mg Tablets
Active Ingredient (per tablet) Amount
Acepromazine Maleate 25 mg