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Special Diet Foods

When your pet is diagnosed with a chronic illness, their once-favorite food might no longer work for them. In some cases, their regular diet may have even contributed to their health issues.

Switching to a special diet designed for their health condition can help relieve symptoms and possibly slow the progression of their disease. With the right nutritional support, your pet may not need to depend on prescription medications as much, though you should always talk to your vet before changing their dosage.

Pet Food For Renal Support
If your pet has kidney disease, they’ll need a food that’s lower in protein, phosphorus, and sodium, all of which can put an extra strain on kidneys that are no longer working at their full capacity.

A therapeutic diet isn’t just all about what foods to avoid. Some foods can help reduce certain symptoms and help prevent complications. Forza10 pet foods are formulated by veterinarians to support your pet’s needs with science-backed recipes. Their renal support options have added cranberries, dried dandelion, and dried clover, which have antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and diuretic properties to support your pet’s urinary tract.

High-moisture diets are essential for kidney health. If you must feed kibble, try mixing it with canned food or adding bone broth (with no salt added), warm water, and/or goat’s milk.

Therapeutic Pet Food For Digestive Issues
While some pets can raid the trash can and not suffer so much as a bellyache, others seem to have trouble digesting even premium pet foods. Diarrhea, vomiting, excessive gas, intestinal noises, and other gastrointestinal issues can sometimes be resolved with the use of a sensitive stomach food.

While fiber is usually a good thing in any diet, it can be tough for a sensitive digestive system to break down and may lead to excessive gas. White rice breaks down easily for a quick source of energy. It’s paired with stomach-soothing herbs like rosehips and oregano in Forza10 Nutraceutic Active Intestinal Support Diet Dry Cat Food. The addition of probiotics helps build a more balanced gut microbiome.

If your pet’s stomach issues do not improve or worsens on a sensitive stomach formula, talk to your veterinarian about testing for underlying causes such as parasites or infection.

Nutritional Support For Itchy Skin
Irritated, itchy skin, especially when accompanied by a yeasty odor, can often be attributed to food intolerances. Cats and dogs sometimes have trouble producing sufficient enzymes to digest certain proteins.

While carbohydrate sources like corn or rice are often blamed for intolerances that cause itching, it’s much more common for protein sources to trigger intolerances. Common proteins used in pet foods such as chicken, beef, and fish.

An elimination diet is made with a single protein source that your pet has never been exposed to, such as bison in Natural Balance L.I.D. Limited Ingredient Diets Sweet Potato & Bison Formula. After feeding an elimination diet for two weeks, you should notice an improvement in your pet’s symptoms. By slowly adding back familiar foods you can often find out what proteins intolerances they might have.

A hydrolyzed protein diet is another option for pets with intolerances. The protein in the food is broken down so that your pet’s immune system no longer reacts to it. BLUE Natural Veterinary Diet HF Hydrolyzed for Food Intolerance Dry Dog Food also contains probiotics. As a pet with intolerances has trouble breaking down proteins, the addition of probiotics to their diet may aid digestion and help reduce symptoms.

Choosing A Therapeutic Diet For Your Pet
Some therapeutic diets require a prescription from your veterinarian. Blue Veterinary Diets need authorization from your vet, while Forza foods are available over the counter. Both can provide nutritional support for your pet's chronic illness. Before changing your pet’s diet, always seek advice from your veterinarian.