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Reduce Cat Litter Odor

While you may not expect your cat’s litter-box to smell like roses, it’s possible to keep odor at a minimum. If your guests ask you if you have a cat as soon as they enter your home, try these tips to help get litter box odor under control.

Why Did My Cat Stop Burying Their Poop?
Animal behavior scientists aren’t sure why cats cover their poop in the first place. It may be to help avoid drawing attention from predators and other cats. When cats do not cover their poop, it could be a way of marking their territory or even showing dominance over another member of the household.
Sometimes cats do not cover their poop because they are not feeling comfortable enough to stay in their litter box long enough to complete the task. Changing litter types, adding depth by using more litter, or using an additional litter-box can help.
Illness or injury can make your cat associate the litter box with pain. A urinary tract infection, kidney stones, or a paw injury can cause your cat to stop burying their poop. It’s worthwhile to monitor your cat for other changes in behavior and talk to your vet about your cat’s change in litter habits at your next appointment.

What Your Cat’s Litter Odor Says About Their Health
While it’s normal for your cat’s poop to smell unpleasant, the odor should not be so powerful that it can be detected from another room. Pungent deposits can be a sign that your cat’s food is difficult for them to digest.

Dry food for cats tends to be high in carbohydrates, either in the form of grains like corn or rice, or grain-free ingredients like peas or lentils. All of these carbohydrate sources supply plant-based fiber that can be difficult for your cat to break down, leading to loose, voluminous wastes on a low protein, high carb diet.

Your cat’s stools should be solid, but not hard, dark brown, and relatively low odor. Many cat parents notice an improvement in stool quality after switching from dry food to a diet that’s higher in animal protein. Raw, fresh cooked, or quality canned diets typically contain more protein and less fiber, resulting in fewer litter box trips per day and smaller, less smelly poops.

Pungent urine or feces can be a sign of an infection or illness, so let your veterinarian know if your cat’s odor does not improve. If your cat has a chronic health condition, talk to your veterinarian before changing their diet.

Tips To Reduce Cat Litter Odor
If your cat has healthy poops and they’re doing a good job of burying it, you may still feel the need to freshen up their litter box area.

Naturally, cleaning your cat’s litter more often will help reduce odor. It can also help to use additional boxes. You’ll want to use at least one box per cat, plus a spare.

You can also sprinkle some baking soda on the bottom of your cat’s litter pan next time you change the litter. The baking soda absorbs excess moisture and gently neutralizes odor.

A self-cleaning litter box is surprisingly affordable and can be a game-changer for you and your cat. The Scoopfree system automatically scoops your cat’s litter-box 20 minutes after they use it, concealing the solid waste into a covered waste trap. If you’re ready to ditch your cat’s litter box completely, the Litter Kwitter kit makes it simple to teach your cat to use your toilet.