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How To Help Your Pet Cope When You Go Back To Work After Quarantine

As quarantine comes to an end, you know your return to your regular job is going to be bittersweet. It's nice to go back to your routine and see your coworkers again, but your pets are going to miss having you home during the day.
For some pets, this transition is going to be especially difficult. The boredom, loneliness, and anxiety of being alone may compel them to misbehave. Barking, crying, potty accidents, and destructiveness are all ways your pet might act out as they struggle to cope with your return to work. Try these tips to help your pet tolerate being alone again.

Spy On Your Pets With An In-Home Camera
It's always a good idea to have a camera setup to monitor your pets when you're not home. You can use an in-home surveillance system like Nest or Simplisafe, or a pet camera like Furbo. In a pinch, you can set up a laptop, tablet, or an old phone to record video or take video calls. With an in-home camera, you can find out if your pet is crying, pacing, or otherwise showing signs of separation anxiety.

Start Your Morning On A Runner's High
Ideally, your dog will spend most of the day napping while you're away. To help them settle down for the day, you can take them out for a short run in the early morning.
Though it may not be your favorite way to wake up, running or jogging, or even just going for a long walk can help you wake up in the morning and put you in a better mood for the rest of the day. Your dog's mood will improve, too, and they will be less likely to bark or get into trouble while you're gone.

Confine Pets To A Safe Space
Before you get ready to leave in the morning, confine your pet to a safe, quiet room, gated-off area, or a crate. You can tuck them in and give them a calm goodbye, then go about your morning routine without having them get anxious while they watch you get ready to leave.
Confining your pets keeps them safe from getting into household chemicals, trash, or other hazards around your home. It also helps curb anxiety by prompting them to take a nap, rather than, say, pace around the house or stare out the window until you come back.

Consider Part-Time Telecommuting
If you were able to work from home during quarantine, consider working 1-2 days per week if you can. You may have noticed that you were able to save money on gas and lunch, and best of all, you were able to de-stress between meetings by hanging out with your pets.