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Ask the Vet About Bladder Stones in Dogs and Cats

Dr. MichaelDym
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While efforts are made to answer all questions as quickly as possible, if an immediate answer is required or if your pet is in need of urgent or emergency care, contact your pet's veterinarian immediately.

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Showing 1 - 15 of 21
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01
DateMar 30, 2021
CategoryBladder Stones
Pet Typenull
TopicSpecial cat food
vet-qa-signature
Question:

My vet put my Kitty cat on special diet. Royal CANIN dry food ( URINARY SO ) can't find on pet Meds. Do I have to get it from VET. everytime I need a bag. I was hoping Pet Meds. had it or something equivalent to it.

Answer:

I don't think we carry prescription foods but contact customer service to know for sure. (This is the Ask the Vet section for medical questions) Here is their contact information: Toll Free Number (Call or Text) 1-800-PetMeds® (1-800-738-6337) Email Address customerservice@1800petmeds.com

02
DateMar 7, 2021
CategoryBladder Stones
Pet Typenull
TopicNutramax Cosequin Soft Chews
vet-qa-signature
Question:

My himalayan cat is prone to urinary stones and is on a strict diet of Science Diet C/D. He has been taking the cosequin capsules. Would it be ok for him to eat the Nutramax Cosequin soft chews, or would this possibly cause him to have urinary stones.

Answer:

That is a really good question - it depends on whether it changes the pH of the urine and only the manufacturer would know that so contact them about that. If they haven't done studies, it is probably safer to stick with the capsules.

03
DateFeb 11, 2021
CategoryBladder Stones
Pet Typenull
TopicBleeding
vet-qa-signature
Question:

I noticed my dog started to lick her privates and she hasn’t done this in a few years and I also noticed sometime she would leak urine and recently she bleed when she peed and I was wondering if it’s a disease of some type maybe

Answer:

If you are seeing blood, yes, something is going on. Have your veterinarian check her out and start with a urinalysis - it may be as simple as a urinary tract infection, but they will also want to rule out other things like bladder stones, cancer, etc. with x-rays and/or ultrasound.

04
DateDec 3, 2020
CategoryBladder Stones
Pet Typenull
TopicFood
vet-qa-signature
Question:

I have a female Snouzer that we have been feeding her Hills Urinary U/D Chicken flavored meat and Hills Prescription Diet Urinary care dry food. What do you have that does the same thing that Hills does as she does not like those foods anymore. Do you have treats i could give her also? Thanks

Answer:

Consult your veterinarian for the best advice - it depends on the exact cyrstal or stone she is predisposed to and things like the pH in her urine that your veterinarian has access to all of that information.

05
DateOct 26, 2020
CategoryBladder Stones
Pet Typenull
TopicAlternatives to conventional medicine
vet-qa-signature
Question:

my cat has bladder stones and was supposed to have surgery. the day of i was called and told they would not be doing the surgery because he has leukemia. they put him on Clavamox 125mg 2x a day for 6 weeks but i was only able to administer for a few days then he started throwing them up. they gave it to me in liquid form which worked for 1 day before he started throwing that up. Ive spent alot of money on these medications for them to expire in my fridge. any suggestions??

Answer:

What is the Clavamox treating? It doesn't treat bladder stones or feline leukemia(FELV). It can definitely upset their stomach, so depending on what kind of infection you are treating, there may be an injectable form of antiotics that won't upset his stomach. Just having FELV isn't a reason (by itself) to not remove bladder stones unless he has a secondary infection of some kind that you are trying to get under control and then do his bladder stone surgery.

06
DateOct 20, 2020
CategoryBladder Stones
Pet Typenull
TopicMeds
vet-qa-signature
Question:

My 12 year old dog can’t control her bladder and I can’t afford the surgery in a lump sum I have offered payments but denied,is there anything I can give her she’s on Proin 75 mil but it’s not working

Answer:

Here is another medication that we often have to use with patients that fail to continue to respond to Proin: https://www.1800petmeds.com/Incurin+Tablets-prod11742.html

07
DateSep 26, 2020
CategoryBladder Stones
Pet Typenull
TopicSurgery or Can they be dissolved
vet-qa-signature
Question:

I just found out my 10yr old Yorkie has bladder stones looks like 6 but they are different sizes and shapes, vet wants to change his diet to Royal Canine Urinary S/O but really expensive. I see there are supplements would that work with another food? Also I see stone breakers could those be broken up or dissolved or does he need surgery? I have the X-Ray. Thank you for your help!

Answer:

Surgery is almost always ideal and instantly curative - Royal Canin S/O is expensive because it works better than anything else.

08
DateAug 7, 2020
CategoryBladder Stones
Pet Typenull
Topicwater
vet-qa-signature
Question:

Hi, I'm finding myself pretty confused by the literature on this topic, so I thought I'd ask. My vet recommended that I give my cat distilled water because she has urinary tract problems. I also have another cat that I've just found out has similar issues. So I'm putting distilled water in the water bowl, which everyone drinks (I also have another cat and two dogs), but now I'm wondering if distilled water is bad because the cats still have the same issues, even with that and changing to a prescription diet. I have observed all the animals drinking it, so I dont think they're opposed to it, but maybe they aren't drinking enough? Am i doing wrong by the whole house of animals here? Thanks for the thoughts. Susan

Answer:

These urinary issues in cats are multifactorial - it sounds like you are doing everything right. Bottled water is better than tap water. Prescription food is usually mandatory as well - not mixed with other food or treats or you negate the effects of the expensive food (like getting the pH just right in the urine, etc.) Gradually changing to entirely canned food is ideal for these kitties as well - primarily to increase the water consumption. Or getting fancy kitty water fountains helps encourage some cats to drink more like this product: https://www.1800petmeds.com/Drinkwell+360+Stainless+Steel+Pet+Fountain-prod60939.html

09
DateJul 15, 2020
CategoryBladder Stones
Pet Typenull
TopicKidney/bladder stones in dogs
vet-qa-signature
Question:

Is there a natural remedy to give a 70-lb German Shepherd to keep bladder stones from coming back? I've heard Renevive for humans, wondering if it is safe for dogs or if there is another option. She seems to have passed little ones, but every now and then looks like she is having a hard time peeing.

Answer:

They form stones based on their genetics and their diet. You can't change her genetics but you have to change her diet or she will continue to get them. You have to know the exact stone she has and choose a diet that is formulated for that exact stone so your veterinarian will know which diet is the best based on her urine tests. Then, in general, a diet of total canned food increases the water content, which is ideal. Then a product like this may help as well, but not by itself without doing all of the above at the same time: https://www.1800petmeds.com/NaturVet+Cranberry+Relief+Plus+Echinacea-prod11018.html

010
DateApr 22, 2020
CategoryBladder Stones
Pet TypeDog
TopicRegarding bladder stones
vet-qa-signature
Question:

Yes, thank you for answering my question! I have a 6 year old Pomeranian and have you ever seen 150 to 200 pea size stones in a 12 lb little dog?

Answer:

Wow - maybe not that many, but yes, it's certainly possible.

011
DateMar 30, 2020
CategoryBladder Stones
Pet TypeDog
TopicSurgery or Diet
vet-qa-signature
Question:

Doctor, my dog is three years old and we recently just found out she has bladder stones. X rays proved she has too many large stones for them to dissolve on their own. I?m scared to do surgery. Is there another route I could take to help and dissolve the bladder stones? She is currently on UTI antibiotics and we switched her over to royal dog food. We give her only filter water. Do bladder stones harm and kill dogs? Is there anything else I can do to help my dog

Answer:

If they are that big and she is a relatively good surgical candidate, surgical removal is usually a pretty quick and easy surgery - far better than trying to medicallly dissolve a really large stone that can potentially lodge in her urethra as it gets smaller. It sounds like you are doing all that you can at the moment without surgery.

012
DateFeb 16, 2020
CategoryBladder Stones
Pet TypeDog
TopicBladder Surgery
vet-qa-signature
Question:

I have an 8.5 year old lab that had a gallstone removed with surgery after she was having difficult time peeing and there was a lot of blood in her vulva. Three (3) weeks after surgery, she is peeing fine but there is still blood? Is this normal?

Answer:

No, the bladder heals very quickly (within 2-3 days) so blood 3 weeks later is not normal. Have your veterinarian recheck her. Keep her from urinating before you take her in so they can get a urine sample.

013
DateFeb 1, 2020
CategoryBladder Stones
Pet TypeDog
TopicDoes my dog need surgery
vet-qa-signature
Question:

Is there any other options I can do for my dog? I took her to the vet and they didn?t do xrays but they felt on her Bella and told me she has bladder stones and that she?s need surgery didn?t give me anymore options sent me home with pain meds and antibiotics until I schedule a surgery date my dog is not sick she eats well the only thing that worried me to seek vet help was the blood in the urine.

Answer:

If the stone was so large that it was easily diagnosed on a physical exam, yes, surgery is probably the best option.

014
DateNov 8, 2019
CategoryBladder Stones
Pet TypeDog
TopicFrequent Urination
vet-qa-signature
Question:

My 10 month old dog got an infected uterus removed 10 days ago. She seems to be healing great, eating, playing, pooping normally. Tons of energy and affection. The only thing I?m worried about is she is squatting way more often to pee while outside. I am bringing a sample of her urine to the vet tomorrow. Could this be something serious?

Answer:

As long as she is able to urinate, it is probably just post-op swelling and/or a urinary tract infection, so definitely have them analyze her urine.

015
DateJul 25, 2019
CategoryBladder Stones
Pet TypeDog
TopicPeeing bleeding
vet-qa-signature
Question:

My dog is bleeding a lot when peeing what can I do?

Answer:

We call this hematuria and there are many underlying causes: urinary tract infection, bladder stones, cancer, clotting abnormalities, etc etc. All of these are treated very differently so see your veterinarian for a diagnosis and appropriate treatment. Keep him/her from urinating a couple hours before the appointment so they can collect a urine sample.

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