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Fluoxetine

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Product Info
How to Use
Ingredients
Customer Reviews
Q&A
Product Info
What is Fluoxetine?

Fluoxetine is an antidepressant belonging to a group of drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI). Fluoxetine requires a prescription from your veterinarian.

For:

Cats and Dogs

Benefits:
  • Helps with obsessive compulsive behaviors such as tail chasing in dogs, or constant licking in dogs and cats, and other behavioral disorders which are otherwise common causes for veterinary visits
  • Easy to administer
How it Works:

Fluoxetine affects chemicals in the brain that can cause depression, panic, anxiety, or obsessive-compulsive behaviors.

Cautions:

Avoid giving other medicines that can make your pet sleepy (cold or allergy medicine, pain medication, muscle relaxants, seizure medicine, or other medications for depression or anxiety). Do not give Reconcile if your pet is using an MAO inhibitor such as Anipryl, selegiline, Preventic Collar, or Mitaban Dip. Side effects that may occur include rash, hives, difficulty breathing, or swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat. If these or any other side effects occur, stop giving your pet Fluoxetine and contact your veterinarian.

Brand Name:

Prozac (Dista), Reconcile (Lilly)

Generic Name:

Fluoxetine (flew-ox-a-teen) HCl

What is fluoxetine:

Fluoxetine is an antidepressant in a group of drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI's). Fluoxetine affects chemicals in the brain that cause depression, panic, anxiety, or obsession-compulsion. Fluoxetine is a prescription medication used in dogs and cats for the treatment of canine aggression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Fluoxetine is available as 10mg tablets and 20mg capsules. The usual dose is dependant on the condition being treated and the animal's response to treatment. It may take up to 3 or 4 weeks before the medication becomes effective.

What should I discuss with my veterinarian before giving fluoxetine:

Do not give fluoxetine if your pet is using and MAO inhibitor such as Anipryl, selegiline, Preventic Collar, or Mitaban Dip. Serious and sometimes fatal reactions can occur when these medications are taken with fluoxetine. You must wait at least 14 days after stopping an MAO inhibitor before you can give fluoxetine. You must wait 5 weeks after stopping fluoxetine before you can give an MAOI. Tell your veterinarian if your pet is allergic to any medications of if your pet has liver disease, kidney disease, diabetes, or seizures. Fluoxetine should not be given to pregnant or lactating animals.

What is the most important information I should know about fluoxetine:

Do not give fluoxetine with a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as Anipryl, selegiline, Preventic Collar or Mitaban Dip. Call your veterinarian at once if new or worsening symptoms such as mood or behavior changes, anxiety, trouble sleeping, irritability, agitation, hostile behavior, aggression, restlessness, hyperactivity. Notify your veterinarian if your pet is pregnant, if you are planning to breed your pet, or if your pet is lactating.

How should this medication be given:

Give fluoxetine exactly as prescribed by your veterinarian. If you do not understand the directions ask your pharmacist or veterinarian to explain them to you. Do not give larger amounts or give it for longer than recommended by your veterinarian. Your veterinarian may occasionally change the dose to achieve the best result. It may take 3 to 4 weeks or longer before fluoxetine takes effect. Do not stop using fluoxetine without first consulting with your veterinarian. Unpleasant side effects can occur if the medication is stopped suddenly. Store fluoxetine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep this medication away from children and other pets.

What happens if I miss giving a dose:

Give the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next regularly scheduled dose, skip the missed the missed dose and give the next one as directed. Do not give a double dose of the medication.

What should I avoid while giving fluoxetine to my pet:

Avoid giving other medicines that can make the pet sleepy such as; cold or allergy medicine, pain medication, muscle relaxers, seizure medicine, or other medications for depression or anxiety. Tell your veterinarian if you give your pet any of these medications regularly.

What are the possible side effects of fluoxetine:

If any of the following serious side effects occur, stop giving fluoxetine and seek emergency veterinary medical attention; an allergic reaction (skin rash or hives, difficulty breathing, swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat). Call your veterinarian at once if your pet has any new or worsening symptoms such as mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, irritability, agitation, hostility, aggression, restlessness, hyperactivity, or increased depression. Call your veterinarian at once if your pet has any serious side effects such as; seizures (convulsions); tremors, shivering, muscle stiffness or twitching; a red, blistering, peeling skin rash; problems with balance or coordination; or agitation, confusion, sweating, fast heartbeat. Less serious side effects may include drowsiness, dizziness, weakness, runny nose, sore throat, nausea, diarrhea, changes in appetite, weight changes, dry mouth. Other side effects may also occur. Talk to your veterinarian about any side effect that seems unusual or bothersome to the animal.

What other drugs will affect fluoxetine:

Talk to your veterinarian before giving your pet any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. This includes carprofen, piroxicam, etodolac, and others. Giving any of these medications with fluoxetine may cause the pet to bruise or bleed easily. Before giving fluoxetine, tell your veterinarian if your pet is being given digoxin, diazepam (Valium), phenytoin (Dilantin), warfarin (Coumadin), amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil). Drugs other than those listed may also interact with fluoxetine. Talk to your veterinarian or pharmacist before giving any prescription or over the counter medicines including herbal supplement.

Where can I get more information:

Your pharmacist has additional information about fluoxetine written for health professionals that you may read.

Call your veterinarian for medical advice about any side effects to your pet. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

How to Use
Directions:
  • Fluoxetine is an antidepressant drug in a group of drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI).
  • Fluoxetine is available by prescription and is used to treat separation anxiety and obsessive compulsive behaviors in dogs and inappropriate elimination in cats.
Tip:

Do not give larger amounts or give for longer than recommended by your veterinarian. It may take 3 to 4 weeks or longer before Fluoxetine takes effect. Do not stop Fluoxetine without first consulting with your veterinarian.

Dosage:
Dogs/Cats:
Weight
Dosage
All weights
Dosage is dependent on the condition being treated, the animal's response to treatment, and the development of any adverse effects. Give exactly as directed by your veterinarian
Horses:
Do not use!
Storage:

Store this medication at room temperature away from heat and moisture.

Ingredients
Fludrocortisone Acetate Tablet:
Active Ingredient
Amount
Fluoxetine Hydrochloride
10 mg
Fludrocortisone Acetate Capsule:
Active Ingredient
Amount
Fluoxetine Hydrochloride
20 mg
Customer Reviews
Fluoxetine is rated 4.490566037735849 out of 5 by 53.
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Didn't Help? My, now 6yr old yorki has been on fluoxitine for 2yr. She has very bad anxiety,but this drug really didn't do anything.
Date published: 2016-08-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Works great! My dog has been on this for a few yrs and it has helped her so much.
Date published: 2016-06-02
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Saved My Dog My vet prescribed this to my dog when he was going though late in life separation anxiety. He broke out of a metal kennel, ate my back door from the knee down, busted windows, and even lost teeth in the process. He hated when I left and it broke my heart. I could barely leave the house but I couldn't stand to put him down, he is my best friend. Fluoxtine in combination with training (!!!) and the adoption of a new sister saved the life of my very sweet but anxious dog. Give the medicine time to work, though! It took 6 months of consistent medication to get him back to normal. And he will probably have to take it for the rest of his life but it's worth every penny to me.
Date published: 2016-04-24
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Helpful for managing anxiety We adopted out shepherd/cattle dog mix, Charlie, not knowing he had severe separation anxiety. He would literally bark non stop, drool excessively, pace, yelp, etc. when left alone. He was too anxious for behavior modification alone to be effective, so our vet recommended combining training with fluoxetine. Charlie takes 10 mg/day (He weighs 45 pounds). It took awhile for us to see a noticeable difference- maybe two and half months? but Charlie now spends most days snoozing on the bed until we get home. I want to note that this is not a cure all drug- Charlie does still have some up and down phases where he has some mild anxiety when left alone, but this usually mellows out after a week or so. Overall, it's made him a much happier, more relaxed dog and he doesn't drive our neighbors crazy. There have been no side effects- no changes in appetite, energy levels, personality, etc.
Date published: 2015-08-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Life Saver! I waited 10 long years for my dog to "settle down," and she never did. What finally changed and made me consider medication was that I was getting too old to get by on six hours of sleep a night, and my knees were actually being injured by her jerking me around while we went for walks. It was as if she forgot she was attached to me, and when something got her attention (a dog a block away, a bird landing 20 feet away, etc.) she would attempt to take off running at it, twisting my leg into a pretzel in the process. I was so embarrassed to ask my vet for medication, but after observing Minnie's behavior, she said that unless I could afford a trainer on Cesar Milan's level, I should start giving her Prozac. I felt so relieved, and it has been a lifesaver. Minnie sleeps all night now, and her behavior in general has just settled down a few notches. She's still happy, lively, and friendly, but pays more attention to me and enjoys just lying on the couch with me and relaxing. No more endless barking, waking me up at 4:00 am for no apparent reason, or going nuts every time she spots another dog. I'm giving her 40 mg per day by capsule, and it seems to be the right dose to keep her a bit calmer and me more rested and sane.
Date published: 2015-07-28
Rated 4 out of 5 by from no more obsession Beau my Standard Poodle, had on open wound on his tail. Did not know how he got it , but it was there. Healed it with antibiotic ointment over a 2 week period. After it was healed, he kept licking it. The area that was quarter size had grown to over 1.5 inches! He was tearing the bandages off to get to it! Cones, muzzles, nothing stopped him. The injury was gone, but now a new problem had arose. Tried bitter apple spray even..nothing worked!! After 4 weeks.....Vet visit and he was place on fluoxetine 20 mg daily. 3 weeks later, no cone, no muzzle, and he doesn't even look at his tail! Hair is growing back nicely too! Will be weaning him off after 1 more month.....Vet said that if he had not left it alone, he might have had it amputated.
Date published: 2015-03-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from great Maddie is now 10 years old and I have had her for 2 years. She is a rescue that came to me with "severe separation anxiety". She is still as hyper as ever but will allow me now to do errands for no more than 2 hours a day. When we got her she tore up the rugs in the hallway. Now we leave the hall door open to the laundry room. She is on her cushion in the hallway waiting for me, She knows I will not leave her and she accepts that I have errands to do.
Date published: 2015-02-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Helped with OCD Bilbo is a 7 yo doxie with epilepsy. He had severe ocd behaviours. Urinating inside, barking non stop, biting and nipping almost without control, licking his brother for hours, and pacing. We tried lots of things, but nothing helped. He is not on meds for epilepsy, but just seems wired wrong. Fluox has helped him control most of these behaviours. Those that are not completely controlled are lessened a lot. He is now able to be groomed and petted, rest without jumping up at every little noise, and sleep through the night. No he is not cured, but it has helped.
Date published: 2015-01-27
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Q&A

After starting this medicine she is scared to go outside at all even more on walks. But now she is scared of food. Even the littlest thing in the house. Does it get any better or should I take her off medicine? 

Asked by: Linda
Two other people commented on this thread that their dog got like this. They contacted their vet to lower the dose and discontinue. They had planned to try something else. My dogs behavior was strange and got progressively worse for about 8-9 days before beginning to improve. It takes up to 6 weeks for the prozac to be fully working.
Answered by: Debbie508
Date published: 2016-05-16

Adding Fluoxetine to Dog Food?

Can the capsule be opened and spread over the dogs food? He always finishes his food and licks the bowl.
Asked by: mastiffmomma
I wouldnt advise doing that. But I'm not a pharmacist. I would just buy the pill pockets for capsules. I cut my pill pockets in half and wrap it around the capsule. The dog thinks he's getting a treat.
Answered by: Debbie508
Date published: 2016-05-16

My dog weighs 15 pounds. What dosage would I use

Asked by: Betty
You should ask your vet. My dog weighs 17lbs and he was started on 10mg.
Answered by: Debbie508
Date published: 2016-05-16

Can this medication cause my dog to be lethergic and have little to no appetite?

Asked by: dpray77
Yes initially it can cause lethargy and tiredness. It can also diminish their appetite. As the treatment progresses they should not be as tired and their appetite should pick up. It can take up to two weeks.
Answered by: Debbie508
Date published: 2016-05-16

Has anyone experienced an increased fear in their dogs?

My 2 year old lab has only been on prozac for 4 days, and 24 hours into it his fear was greatly intensified, he won't go on our normal walks (although I can drive him 50 feet down the street and he can)- outside he shakes and whines. He has exhibited changes in behavior and increased fear in the past, but this time I can't pinpoint the change, other than possibly the prozac, but I would assume it's too seeon to tell.
Asked by: Scaredpup
I found that the behavior I was trying to modify also became amplified after starting prozac. Around the 8-9th day it was absolutely horrible. On the 10th day almost all the behavior was gone or I was able to re-direct him. I'd at least stick with it for a minimum of 14 days. It takes 6 weeks to achieve the full effect.
Answered by: Debbie508
Date published: 2016-05-16

fluoxetine oral

need fluoxetine oral liquid, gel or tiny tab, chewables,injection (2.5mg) for a cat. She is attacking her own tail aggressively.
Asked by: helpless
You could also try pill pockets for cats
Answered by: Debbie508
Date published: 2016-05-16

How often should I give Fluoxetine to my dog?

My 48-pound springer spaniel has severe separation anxiety. My vet prescribed 20 mg. of Fluroxetine, which I began today. Do I have to give this to her every single day or can I give it to her only when I leave for 2-3 hours? Joan McCloskey
Asked by: Joan
It is not recommended to stop and start this medication. This drug can cause withdrawl symptoms if abruptly stopped.
Answered by: Debbie508
Date published: 2016-04-14

Does the fluoxetine come in 40mg doses

My vet has prescribed 40 mg for my dog
Asked by: Joyce
We do not carry this medication in the indicated strength
Answered by: Stephanie Duesler, Pharm. D, MBA
Date published: 2015-08-28
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