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Amitriptyline HCl

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Product Info
How to Use
Ingredients
Customer Reviews
Q&A
Product Info
What is Amitriptyline?

Amitriptyline is a tricyclic antidepressant. It's used to treat certain behavioral problems, such as separation anxiety, fear of noises, and anxiety in dogs, and urinating out of the litter box, spraying, and anxiety in cats. Amitriptyline requires a prescription from your veterinarian.

For:

Cats and Dogs

Benefits:
  • Treats behavioral issues in dogs, such as separation anxiety
  • Remedies feline behavioral problems, like urinating outside the litter box
  • Reduces the frequency of vet visits
How it Works:

Amitriptyline affects chemicals in the brain that become unbalanced, leading to behavioral problems in your pet.

Cautions:

Side effects of Amitriptyline may include drowsiness, dizziness, loss of appetite, and urinary retention, and this product may interact with other products your pet is taking.

Brand Name:

Elavil (Merck)

Generic Name:

Amitriptyline (am-e-trip'-ta-lean)

What is Amitriptyline:

Amitriptyline is a Tricyclic antidepressant. Amitriptyline affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced leading to behavioral problems in dogs and cats. Amitriptyline is used in dogs to treat conditions such as separation anxiety, anxiety and fear of noise. In cats, amitriptyline is used to treat conditions such as urinating outside of the litter box, spraying, excessive grooming and anxiety. Amitriptyline may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this guide.

What should I discuss with my veterinarian before giving amitriptyline to my pet:

Do not give this medication if your pet has taken or used a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as selegiline, Mitaban Dip or Preventic Collar within the last 14 days. Tell your veterinarian if your pet has liver or kidney disease; asthma; thyroid disease; diabetes; stomach or intestinal problems; high blood pressure or heart disease; difficulty urinating, or glaucoma. Tell your veterinarian if the pet is pregnant or lactating.

What is the most important information I should know about amitriptyline:

Amitriptyline is a prescription medication not FDA approved for veterinary use; however, it is a commonly accepted practice for veterinarians to use this medication in dogs and cats. Amitriptyline is available as 10mg, 25mg, 50mg and 75mg tablets. The usual initial dose for dogs is 0.5-2mg per pound every 8-12 hours. The usual dose in cats is 5-10mg per cat once a day, at night. This medication may not help symptoms right away. It may take a number of days before symptoms begin to lessen. Contact your veterinarian if symptoms get worse or if new symptoms develop while the pet is on this medication. Amitriptyline may cause drowsiness or dizziness.

How should this medication be given:

Give this medication exactly as directed by your veterinarian. Allow pet to drink plenty of water. If you do not understand the directions ask the pharmacist or veterinarian to explain them to you. Do not stop giving amitriptyline suddenly. This could cause symptoms such as nausea, headache and malaise. Store amitriptyline at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep this medication away from children and pets.

What happens if I miss giving a dose:

Give the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if is almost time for the next regularly scheduled dose, skip the missed dose and take the next one as directed. Do not give a double dose of the medication.

What should I avoid while giving Amitriptyline to my pet:

Amitriptyline may cause dizziness or drowsiness.

What are the possible side effects of Amitriptyline:

If any of the following serious side effects occur, stop giving amitriptyline and seek emergency veterinary medical attention; an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; swelling of the lips, tongue or face, or hives); seizures; a fast or irregular heartbeat; high blood pressure; difficulty urinating; panting, muscle stiffness or severe muscle weakness. Other less serious side effects may occur. Continue giving amitriptyline and talk to your veterinarian if your pet has drowsiness or dizziness; dry mouth and eyes; constipation; panting; mild agitation, weakness or headache; nausea or loss of weight or appetite. Other side effects may also occur. Talk to your veterinarian about any side effect that seems unusual or bothersome to your pet.

What other drugs will affect Amitriptyline:

Do not give this medication if your pet has taken or used a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as selegiline, Mitaban Dip or Preventic Collar within the last 14 days. Amitriptyline may increase the effects of other drugs that may cause drowsiness, including other antidepressants, antihistamines, sedatives, pain relievers, anxiety medications, and muscle relaxants. Drugs other than those listed may also interact with amitriptyline. Talk to your veterinarian or pharmacist before giving any prescription or over the counter medicines including herbal products.

How to Use
Directions:
  • Amitriptyline is a tricyclic antidepressant available by prescription for use in dogs to treat certain behavioral problems such as separation anxiety, fear of noises, and anxiety.
  • Amitriptyline is not FDA approved for use in veterinary medicine; however, it is a commonly accepted practice for veterinarians to prescribe this medication for dogs and cats.
  • Amitriptyline is used in cats to treat urinating out of the litter box, spraying, and anxiety.
  • Do not give this medication if your pet is or has been using an MAOi (monoamine oxidase inhibitor) such as Selegiline, Anipryl, Mitaban Dip, or Preventic Collar within the last 14 days.
Tip:

It may take a number of days before symptoms begin to lessen. Allow pet to drink plenty of water. Do not stop giving Amitriptyline suddenly.

Dosage:
Dogs:
Weight
Dosage
All weights
The usual initial dose is 0.5-2 mg per pound of pet's body weight every 8-12 hours
Cats/Kittens:
Weight
Dosage
All weights
The usual dose is 5-10 mg once a day, at night
Horses:
Do not use!
Storage:

Store Amitriptyline at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Ingredients
Amitriptyline:
Active Ingredient
Amount
Amitriptyline HCL
10 mg
Other Ingredients: Colloidal silicone dioxide, hydroxypropyl cellulose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, lactose (monohydrate), magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, polyethylene glycol, pregelatinized starch (corn), titanium dioxide. 10 mg dose also includes: D & C Red # 27 Aluminum Lake, D & C Yellow #10 Aluminum Lake, and FD & C Blue #1 Aluminum Lake. 25 mg dose also includes: D & C Yellow Aluminum Lake. 50 mg dose also includes: FD & C Blue #2 Aluminum Lake, and FD & C Red #40 Aluminum Lake. 75 mg dose also includes: D & C Red #7 Calcium Lake, and FD & C Blue #2 Aluminum Lake.
Amitriptyline:
Active Ingredient
Amount
Amitriptyline HCL
25 mg
Other Ingredients: Colloidal silicone dioxide, hydroxypropyl cellulose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, lactose (monohydrate), magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, polyethylene glycol, pregelatinized starch (corn), titanium dioxide. 10 mg dose also includes: D & C Red # 27 Aluminum Lake, D & C Yellow #10 Aluminum Lake, and FD & C Blue #1 Aluminum Lake. 25 mg dose also includes: D & C Yellow Aluminum Lake. 50 mg dose also includes: FD & C Blue #2 Aluminum Lake, and FD & C Red #40 Aluminum Lake. 75 mg dose also includes: D & C Red #7 Calcium Lake, and FD & C Blue #2 Aluminum Lake.
Amitriptyline:
Active Ingredient
Amount
Amitriptyline HCL
50 mg
Other Ingredients: Colloidal silicone dioxide, hydroxypropyl cellulose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, lactose (monohydrate), magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, polyethylene glycol, pregelatinized starch (corn), titanium dioxide. 10 mg dose also includes: D & C Red # 27 Aluminum Lake, D & C Yellow #10 Aluminum Lake, and FD & C Blue #1 Aluminum Lake. 25 mg dose also includes: D & C Yellow Aluminum Lake. 50 mg dose also includes: FD & C Blue #2 Aluminum Lake, and FD & C Red #40 Aluminum Lake. 75 mg dose also includes: D & C Red #7 Calcium Lake, and FD & C Blue #2 Aluminum Lake.
Amitriptyline:
Active Ingredient
Amount
Amitriptyline HCL
75 mg
Other Ingredients: Colloidal silicone dioxide, hydroxypropyl cellulose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, lactose (monohydrate), magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, polyethylene glycol, pregelatinized starch (corn), titanium dioxide. 10 mg dose also includes: D & C Red # 27 Aluminum Lake, D & C Yellow #10 Aluminum Lake, and FD & C Blue #1 Aluminum Lake. 25 mg dose also includes: D & C Yellow Aluminum Lake. 50 mg dose also includes: FD & C Blue #2 Aluminum Lake, and FD & C Red #40 Aluminum Lake. 75 mg dose also includes: D & C Red #7 Calcium Lake, and FD & C Blue #2 Aluminum Lake.
Customer Reviews
Amitriptyline HCl is rated 4.1591 out of 5 by 44.
Rated 5 out of 5 by from This predict has helped Shans a great deal. She is going to be twelve this year and really never be cured. It's no fun for her. But the product helps
Date published: 2015-08-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Love this product My dog was eating his backside. He has drawn blood it was so bad. The first 2 days using the medicine, I also had him wear a cone. His sores cleared up and he is good.
Date published: 2015-05-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Works wonders for our dogs. Our girls used to get into fights and become aggressive towards each other. With the Amitriptyline they are calmer and for over a year we have had no fights. We have two Old English Sheepdogs and when they get into it, it is not pretty. Glad we were able to find something to help with them getting along all the time.
Date published: 2014-09-30
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Hasn't worked for us yet I had such high hopes for this medication, but after 4 weeks on it (10 mg a day) my 5-year old neutered male Sammie is still spraying and going outside the box. We got him as a rescue about 2 months ago and he started spraying a few days after coming here. Had been told the reason he'd been given up was for spraying but the rescue place said they'd never seen him spray so I thought I'd take a chance on him. We have another cat (they get along OK but do have the ocassional altercation) and a dog who ignores him. Sammie was found to have some crystals in his urine, so he's been on Prescription Diet c/d. Was tested last week and still has a few crystals; was put on an antibiotic because they found a few red & white blood cells in his urine, too. The antibiotic gave him diarrhea, but thank goodness he at least does #2 in the litter boxes. The vet says she wants to clear up his urine before trying another medication, which I guess I can understand, but cleaning up after him every day is no fun. I can easily see why spraying is the #1 reason for turning in a beloved kitty cat, but I haven't given up on this guy yet. The vet suggested I get a leash and harness for him and get him outside, as that might help. I'll try anything at this point. There's also a new Prescription Diet food for "urinary stress" which I'll try. One of the vet techs says it helped her mother's spraying cat enormously.
Date published: 2014-07-26
Rated 4 out of 5 by from kitty uses litter box again Honeycat was semi-feral when I adopted her, and she's always been nervous. I've had her 10 months and suddenly she started going outside the litter box. I suspected it was her nerves, and a urinary test cleared her of medical issues, so the vet prescribed amitriptyline to settle her down and make her feel more secure so she doesn't need to "mark" territory. The one drawback is that it's hard to get her to take the pills, especially half-pills, because they are so bitter.
Date published: 2014-02-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from PetMeds Came Through My cat started marking furniture (he's 7 and was neutered as a kitten#. After a series of test my local vet felt it was all anxiety disorder #my other cat was determined to have total control). She put LE on Amitriptyline & it worked! However, I was buying from my vet as a much higher price. Since I have 2 cats, 2 dogs & a horse to take care of, I welcome any discount I can get! I've dealt with PetMeds for years so new to go to their site. Highly recommend them.
Date published: 2013-12-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent product Two female dogs of mine were prone to fights, although infrequently, were damaging to them and to me. There was little warning. After the vet recommended this drug for them, they have become reliable friends, playing together, and no fights or even threatening behavior. I am thrilled. 800PetMeds offers this drug made by Sandoz. I had tried the same drug but manufactured by another company through my local drugstore, and it did not work.
Date published: 2013-01-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Life changer! Our dog was adopted from a local shelter this year, who had rescued him from another shelter in northern KY. He's a Tibetian terrier and unknown to all had lots of anxiety/abandonment issues. After destroying several pieces of furniture and a large area rug, we were running out of options and didn't want to crate him all the time. He is a lover and has ton of energy. We turned to this product, and have a changed dog! I highly recommend it...has calmed our dog down, and he has quit chewing up everything in sight!
Date published: 2012-12-08
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Q&A

My dog is 11lbs and has insane separation anxiety, he's a chihuahua min pin mix, how many mgs should I get for him?

Asked by: Imanijohnny
The usual initial dose of Amitriptyline is 0.5-2 mg per pound of pet's body weight every 8-12 hours; however, your veterinarian will determine the proper dose for your pet's condition.
Answered by: Lisa M
Date published: 2016-11-24

Can this medication be used for nerve pain in pets as in humans?

Asked by: janet
Amitriptyline is a tricyclic antidepressant. It's used to treat certain behavioral problems, such as separation anxiety, fear of noises, and anxiety in dogs, and urinating out of the litter box, spraying, and anxiety in cats.
Answered by: Christine
Date published: 2016-10-22

My cat, and a foster cat have been on 1 Amitripiline pill a day for less than 3 weeks now.  If I notice side effects (diahrrea, etc), how can I, as quickly as is safely possible, wean them or take them off of it?  

Asked by: dsbailey70
Speak with your veterinarian if you are going to taper this medication. They will be able to tell you how to taper it correctly.
Answered by: Christine
Date published: 2016-09-29

Not able to add product to cart why?

Asked by: samwatson
Make sure you are selecting a strength before you try adding Amitriptyline to your cart. This medication requires a prescription. We will ask for your veterinarians information at checkout.
Answered by: Christine
Date published: 2016-09-29

how quickly will resultsbe seen in canine

Asked by: dk
It probably isn't best to rely upon answers from people that cannot spell the name of their dog's breed correctly, even if they are an RPh.
Answered by: GasparsGirl
Date published: 2015-09-02

IS this contraindicated for cats with severe asthma on albuterol?

Asked by: Callie
Amitriptyline can interact with some asthma medications, by either increasing or decreasing the effect of the other drug You should definitely discuss this with your veterinarian if your vet is giving you a prescription for both of them.
Answered by: Kelly P
Date published: 2015-04-09

larger dose

Does it come in 100mg for larger dogs?
Asked by: magnum
Yes. Unfortunately, we do not carry the 100mg strength. Please check with your local human pharmacy as the medication is also prescribed for humans. If they do not stock it, they usually have the ability to order it for the next day.
Answered by: Lilli Pharmacist
Date published: 2014-10-03

Why is it important that cats are given the medication at night?

The pharmacist that fills my cat's prescription says it can be given any time of day, and that my cat will be most drowsy after the first few hours of dosage. I have been giving it to him in the morning before I leave for work so he doesn't get anxious.
Asked by: Grace
A possible side effect of amitriptyline is drowsiness which could be why the evening dosing is recommended. Most cats however tend to be nocturnal therefore giving your pet the medication the mornings is not considered the wrong approach either.
Answered by: Lilli Pharmacist
Date published: 2014-09-04
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