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Acepromazine

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Starts $0.65 $0.47 per tablet
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Product Info
How to Use
Ingredients
Customer Reviews
Q&A
Product Info
What is Acepromazine?

Acepromazine is a phenothiazine tranquilizer that is used prior to anesthesia and surgery because of its sedative effects and its ability to prevent vomiting. It's also used as an aid in controlling excited animals during examinations, treatments, and grooming. Acepromazine requires a prescription from your veterinarian, and is sold per tablet.

For:

Cats and Dogs

Benefits:
  • An effective tranquilizer
  • Controls overly excitable animals
  • Can prevent vomiting post surgery
  • Sold affordably per tablet
How it Works:

Acepromazine is classified as a phenothiazine neuroleptic, which means it modifies the chemicals in your pets brain to change their behavior. Its a tranquilizer that depresses the central nervous system. The mechanism of action is not exactly known, however, its thought to block receptors of dopamine in the brain, a chemical used for cell-to-cell communication.

Cautions:

Tell your veterinarian if your pet has liver disease, heart disease, seizure disorders, or if the pet is pregnant or lactating. You should also mention other CNS (Central Nervous System) medications such as clomipramine, fluoxetine, and Reconcile or monoamine oxidase inhibitors such as Anipryl, Selegiline, or Preventic Collar that you are giving or using on your pet.

Brand Name:

Aceproject (Vetus), Aceprotabs (Vetus), PromAce (Fort Dodge)

Generic Name:

Acepromazine (ace PRO ma zeen)

What is the most important information I should know about Acepromazine:

Acepromazine is a prescription medicine FDA approved for veterinary use in dogs only; however it is a commonly accepted practice for veterinarians to use acepromazine in cats. Acepromazine is available as 10mg and 25mg tablets. Each tablet is quarter scored. The usual dose for dogs and cats is 0.25-1 mg/lb. Acepromazine may color the urine pink. Occasionally, this medication may have an opposite effect causing stimulation, therefore this medication should not be used to treat aggression.

What is Acepromazine:

Acepromazine is a phenothiazine tranquilizer used by veterinarians as an aid in tranquilization and before using anesthesia. Acepromazine may also be used for purposes other than those listed.

What should I discuss with my veterinarian before giving acepromazine to my pet:

Tell your veterinarian if your pet has liver disease, heart disease, seizure disorders or if the pet is pregnant or lactating. Also mention other CNS medications, such as Phenobarbital, that your pet may be taking.

How should this medication be given:

Give this medication exactly as directed by your veterinarian. Acepromazine should be given 45 minutes to 1 hour prior to the procedure for the medication to take effect. If you do not understand the directions ask the pharmacist or veterinarian to explain them to you. Store acepromazine at room temperature, away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss giving a dose:

Give the missed dose as soon as you remember during the same day. However, if you don't remember until the next day, skip the dose you missed and give only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not give a double dose of the medication.

What happens if I overdose the pet:

Seek emergency veterinary medical treatment. Symptoms of overdose may include excess drowsiness, slow heart rate and breathing, unsteady movement, unconsciousness, low blood pressure or seizures.

What should I avoid while giving acepromazine to my pet:

Do not give your pet epinephrine or CNS depressant medications such as Phenobarbital.

What are the possible side effects of acepromazine:

Stop giving acepromazine and seek emergency veterinary medical care in the event of rare allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; swelling of the lips; tongue; or face; or hives). Other, less serious side effects that have been reported but may resolve with continued treatment. Continue to give acepromazine and notify your veterinarian if your pet show signs of sedation, depression, incoordination, low blood pressure, slower heart rate and breathing. Other side effects may also occur. Talk to your veterinarian about any side effect that seems unusual or bothersome to the animal.

What other drugs will affect acepromazine:

Before giving acepromazine, tell your veterinarian if your pet is being given phenytoin, antiarrhythmics such as quinidine and beta blockers such as propranolol. Antidiarrheal medications and antacids may reduce the effectiveness of acepromazine.

Where can I get more information:

Your pharmacist has additional information about acepromazine written for health professionals that you may read.

How to Use
Directions:
  • Acepromazine is a prescription tranquilizer use by veterinarians in dogs and cats.
  • Acepromazine is typically used prior to anesthesia and surgery because of its sedative effects and because it can prevent vomiting.
  • It is also used as an aid in controlling excited animals during examination, treatment, and grooming.
Tip:

Acepromazine may color the urine pink. Occasionally, this medication may have an opposite effect causing stimulation; therefore this medication should not be used to treat aggression.

Dosage:
Dogs/Cats:
Weight
Dosage
All weights
Give 0.25-1 mg per pound of pet's body weight by mouth. Should be given 45 minutes to 1 hour prior to the procedure
Horses:
Do not use!
Storage:

Should be stored at room temperature. Keep away from moisture and heat.

Ingredients
Acepromazine:
Active Ingredient (per tablet)
Amount
Acepromazine Maleate
25 mg
Customer Reviews
Acepromazine is rated 4.1 out of 5 by 72.
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Worked well Our 10 year old shitzu has a very hard time going to the groomer. We give him half a tablet an hour before and another half tablet a half hour before the appt. Seems to work well and makes it much easier on the groomer and Rocky. Also, it does not seem to have any side effects like over sedation.
Date published: 2017-02-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Anixety relief Our little Pekingese is afraid of any loud noise, we did not know what to for the little guy. Our vet recommended this product and it works great.
Date published: 2017-01-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Very effective! Got this for my 6.5 lbs chihuahua. he has car motion sickness and this medicine sure does work really well. he was a little kinds drunk but i was surprised because he was still active and playing with other dogs. he didn't threw up anymore as well!
Date published: 2016-11-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Dog had broke foot I have a Doberman and she gets anxiety even if she had pain pills during her recovery got this medication from my veterinarian on a follow-up because my dog would jump around like a poodle and I was concerned with her injuring herself further during this healing time this medication is great it subsided her anxiety and from her bolting out the door to go to the bathroom I would give this a high review as the first time I've ever seen my dog relax as she should after surgery
Date published: 2016-09-01
Rated 4 out of 5 by from My 11 year old Rat terrier is scared to death of lighting and thunderstorms, up till recently this drug has worked great, but the last few times, even though I have only given her 1/2 the dosage, she has been experiencing light seizure activity. Very scary! I have decided to quit giving it to her entirely.
Date published: 2016-07-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great for separation anxiety. My dog is part husky and they are known for expressing themselves. Joey has some separation anxiety that used to be pretty bad. I tried every single kind of chew/treat out there to help him with this, but it didn't work in the least. Acepromazine has, though, and the only thing to consistently work. Be advised, however, to give your pup their pill 30-60 minutes BEFORE whatever causes the anxiety is about to happen (thunderstorm, leaving, vet, etc.) as it needs the time to distribute in their body. It WILL NOT work if they are already upset/scared/freaking out to say the least.
Date published: 2016-07-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from worked very well Our 15 yr old, 40 lb (a bit chubby) cockapoo is a sweet, loving member of our family, but recently has been vicious when attempting to clip her nails or even groom her. We gave her 25 mg but she still tried to bite when grooming her face. I reluctantly gave her half a pill more..she was soon very easy to handle. She did have a difficult time walking for about 16 hrs and her eyes were a bit scary. The next day..back to normal and we felt blessed.
Date published: 2016-04-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Product calmed her down. Lulu is a Lab/pit mix and is approx. 65-70 lbs. She got frightened of having her nails clipped and she won't even let us touch her nails. We gave her two pills and were able to trim her nails without any problems. She acted drunk for awhile but came out of it her normal active self. \ \
Date published: 2014-06-18
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Q&A

I have a SUPER hyperactive 9 month old, 8 pound Chihuahua Mix. I cant take her to clip her nails without her nearly drawing blood from either myself or the groomer. Can i give her this medication to calm her down enough to get through the nail clipping?

Asked by: AMA20
Yes this medication is ok to give to your dog. Consult with your veterinarian on dose and a prescription.
Answered by: Ben B
Date published: 2017-02-21

My dog is about 30 lbs, goes insane when I leave him alone and tears down doors, couchs, mattresses, anything he can. Would this be a good thing to give him before I leave to go anywhere for a few hrs? 

Asked by: pjust
Yes this would help calm your dog down.
Answered by: Ben B
Date published: 2017-02-21

We have this to our Pugalier..just one and he is still sleepy...that was Friday night...it's now Sunday night. 

Asked by: Rogerrubylily
Hello, This medication is an effective tranquilizer and can help prevent vomiting post procedures. If you want less sleepy side effects, try cutting the pill into fourths or talking to your veterinarian about lowering the dose. The sleepy side effects should were off soon if you stopped giving this medication. Hope this helped, Pharmacy Intern
Answered by: Ben B
Date published: 2017-02-17

Can a 25 mg tablet be cut in quarters?

Asked by: Illua
Hello Illua, You can cut these into quarters. Usually a tablet with lines indented in the medication are aids to help cut the pill. Thanks for asking, Pharmacy Intern
Answered by: Ben B
Date published: 2017-02-16

What would the dose be for a 65lb terrier mix?

Asked by: quaasz
Hello, The dosing for all weights for this medication is 0.25-1mg per pound of weight. You can use 2 tablets at 50mg. Thanks for asking, Pharmacy Intern
Answered by: Ben B
Date published: 2017-02-16

I have 2- 3 lb. Female Yorkies. I have to make an 8 hour trip. Can I give my girls 1/4 of 10mg. Pill of acepromazine? Thanks

Asked by: Toot5224
Typically doses are 0.25-1 mg per pound of pet's body weight by mouth, given 45 minutes to 1 hour prior to tranquilizer effect is needed. For your 2-3 lb Yorkies, 2.5 mg (1/4 of the 10 mg tablet) falls within this dosage range.
Answered by: Christine
Date published: 2017-02-09

I just bought a condo and I have 2 very anxious 12 year old cats and will be moving them for the 2nd time in their lives. They refuse all oral medication. Can I get this medicine as an injection?

Asked by: Janis
Unfortunately, we only have Acepromazine available in tablet form.
Answered by: Christine
Date published: 2017-01-20

Do people use acepromazine? How would it effect humans?

Asked by: Tess
Acepromazine is approved for dogs and cats only, not humans.
Answered by: Christine
Date published: 2017-02-09
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