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Michael Dym, V.M.D.
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Michael Dym, V.M.D.
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Dr. Michael Dym
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Is Interceptor Safe For My Dog or Cat?

Is Interceptor safe for my dog or cat?

In general, heartworm preventatives like Interceptor are considered to be safe when used as recommended by your veterinarian. However, as with most medications there can be some side effects that may be associated with it.

Over 75 different breeds of dogs have been tested and proved Interceptor to be safe. Pregnant females, breeding males and females, and puppies over two weeks of age have all been tested with Interceptor as well. In well-controlled clinical field studies, 786 dogs completed treatment of the heartworm preventative Interceptor with milbemycin oxime. Milbemycin oxime was used safely in animals receiving frequently used veterinary products such as vaccines, anthelmintics, antibiotics, steroids, flea collars, shampoos and dips.

When to use Interceptor

As a preventative medication, Interceptor is used to protect your pet against heartworms before they infect your dog or cat. Unless otherwise noted by your veterinarian, you can give your pet heartworm medicine (with a prescription) each month to reduce the risk of heartworm disease.

Although prevention is the best way to combat this disease, there are some cases which pets may still become infected. Would you know the signs and symptoms to look for if your pet has heartworm disease? Unfortunately, when pets are initially infected, there are hardly any signs of the disease. This is because it typically takes several months for the signs to appear. Common signs of heartworm disease includes:

Signs of heartworms in dogs:

  • Cough
  • Exercise intolerance
  • Weight loss
  • Fainting
  • Edema

Signs of heartworms in cats:

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Coughing/gagging
  • Heavy/ fast breathing
  • Vomiting
  • Anorexia/weight loss
  • Lethargy
  • Seizures
  • Fainting
  • Lack of coordination