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5 “Mew Year” Resolutions for Cat Parents in 2022

Are you ready to make 2022 your cat’s best year yet? Whether you’re starting the year with a clumsy kitten or a snuggly senior, take some time to set some goals for their health and wellness. Here are five resolutions you can make this “Mew Year.”

Achieve or maintain a healthy weight.
Over half of all house cats in the United States are overweight or obese. Chances are, your own cat might need to lose a little weight. If you’re not sure, you can assess your cat’s body condition at home or ask your veterinarian at the next wellness visit. If your cat is overweight, you will need to cut back on their daily caloric intake without cutting back on essential nutrients. To do this, make sure your cat is on a complete, balanced formula that’s suitable for their life stage and lifestyle. For example, if your cat is eight years old and lives indoors, you may want to switch them to an indoor cat food or senior recipe. Switching to a wet or fresh food can help as they’re lower in carbohydrates than kibble. Monitor your cat’s food intake with measured, scheduled meals, rather than letting them free-feed from a full bowl throughout the day.

Go on more adventures.
Just because you have an indoor cat does not mean that they cannot ever see the outside world. Going on leashed walks with your cat in a quiet neighborhood can be a great way to make sure they get more exercise and mental stimulation. Cats can take weeks to adapt to wearing a leash and harness, and some never take to it. A cat carrier that converts into a backpack is another way your cat can safely go on journeys with you.

Make your home more cat-friendly.
Cats feel happier and less stressed when they have plenty of high-up vantage points, window perches, and hidden nooks to explore around their home. They also tend to keep off forbidden surfaces like kitchen counters when they have plenty of vertical space to climb. Adding more bookshelves, cat trees, floating wall shelves, window perches, and covered beds are some of the ways you can make your home into a kitty sanctuary.

Keep your cat hydrated.
Chronic dehydration is one of the leading causes of health issues in cats. By making sure your cat has constant access to clean, flowing water, you can help keep their digestive system and their urinary tract healthy. Cats tend to depend on their food source for moisture, so it’s best to feed canned or fresh cooked or raw food instead of kibble whenever possible. Also, free-flowing cat fountains keep water fresh and encourage drinking.

Take more photos.
There’s no such thing as taking too many photos and videos of your cat, even if you’ll have to clear up space on your phone’s camera roll, get more cloud storage, or make prints. Taking photos can also help you monitor your kitten’s growth, keep track of your cat’s weight, or just keep an eye on their outward signs of wellness. Best of all, you can make the most of every cuddle, every antic, and all the purrs.