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Why Is My Dog Drinking So Much Water?

Have you been refilling your dog’s water bowl more than usual?
Some dogs drink more than others, but a sudden change in your dog’s water consumption can be a sign that something else is going on.

How Much Water Should Your Dog Drink Per Day?
Generally, your dog should drink about one ounce of water per pound of body weight per day. So, your fifty pound dog may drink around 6.25 cups of water daily. However, the amount of water dogs drink varies greatly depending on the weather, activity levels, and diet.
What may be a lot of water for one dog may be typical for another. If you notice a significant increase in your dog’s water consumption, it makes sense to investigate.

When Excessive Water Drinking Signifies A Problem
When your dog is drinking more water than usual, it may be because the weather has warmed up, they’re going outside more, or you’ve changed their diet from a high water content diet (such as cooked, raw, or canned) to dry kibble.
But if there’s no obvious explanation in your dog’s sudden change in water consumption, it could be a sign of a medical issue.
Diabetes, kidney disease, and Cushing’s disease are some of the most common medical conditions that cause increased thirst. Schedule a visit with your veterinarian as soon as you can for treatment. Let your veterinarian know if your dog has any concurrent symptoms like hair loss, sudden weight changes, or changes in appetite.

Should You Take Away Your Dog’s Water?
Increased water intake is often associated with increased urination. Your dog may ask to go outside more often or they may have accidents in the house. Some dogs may urinate in their bed while they’re sleeping.
You should always give your dog access to fresh, clean water. If they have a medical issue, withholding water can make their condition worse. Instead, work with your veterinarian to diagnose their underlying issue.
Sometimes, though, dogs can drink too much water and dilute the sodium concentration in their blood, an acute condition called hyponatremia. Hyponatremia is most common in active dogs who spend all day outdoors, especially if they unintentionally swallow water while playing in a lake or pool.
Symptoms include vomiting, dizziness, and in severe cases, seizures. Watch your athletic dog’s water intake, provide electrolytes in the form of unflavored Pedialyte or low-sodium, unseasoned broth. Call your vet right away if you suspect your dog is suffering from hyponatremia.