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Adopting Two Cats At The Same Time: Why Two Kittens Are Better Than One

If you’re thinking about adopting a cat, consider this: what do we have two hands for, if not to pet two cats at once? With two cats, not only do you get to be the center of a kitty sandwich every morning, you also get the peace of mind that your cat won’t be lonely when you’re not home.

Do Cats Like To Live With Other Cats?
Though they’re more independent than dogs, cats can suffer from loneliness and a lack of mental stimulation when they spend long days alone at home. Some kitty duos bond by snuggling up to one another, while others enjoy tandem cleaning sessions, and others play-fight the day away. Don’t be surprised if your pair accomplishes all three on an especially productive day.

How To Find The Perfect Pair
Adopting two kittens from the same litter generally ensures that they will get along. You can also seek a bonded pair of adult cats at your local shelter. If you cannot find siblings or a bonded pair, two young kittens from different litters can bond when they grow up together.

If you decide to adopt two adult cats that do not know one another, expect to have a transitionary period of a few months while they learn to spend time together.

It was once widely believed that cats that live together have the best chances of getting along if they are of the opposite sex. Now, cat experts say it’s much more important that the cats are both sociable and have complementary personalities.

What To Share & What Not To Share
Even bonded pairs that love to share a bed or a sunbeam need their own space at times. Separate beds and various elevated spaces like window perches and shelves give your cats the freedom to cuddle or lounge on their own.

Always give your cats separate food bowls, preferably in different areas of your home. It’s also a good idea to have multiple water bowls throughout your home, both to prevent disputes over resources and to help encourage your cats to stay hydrated.

Set up one litter box for each cat, plus at least one extra.

Your cats will also need separate carriers if they ever fly by air. They may take comfort in sharing a carrier on the way to the veterinarian, however.

Avoiding Conflicts In Multi-Cat Households
It’s normal for housemates to spar and chase one another. It’s also normal for cats to occasionally hiss or growl as a warning when their housemate annoys them.

Cats may fight over resources, including food, treats, toys, or even custody of your lap. They can also become heated during mating season, especially if one or both cats are not fixed. Talk to your veterinarian about the best time to have your cats spayed or neutered.

Feliway is useful to have in a multi-cat household. It’s a synthetic form of the pheromones that cats emit when they rub their face on your leg or on household surfaces. The pheromone makes cats feel calm and secure, helping to minimize conflict and problem behaviors. It comes as a spray that you can apply to beds and scratching posts, and as a plug-in diffuser.