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Ask the Vet About Lymphoma in Dogs and Cats

Lymphoma in Dogs and Cats
Symptoms & Diagnosis
Treatment
Ask the Vet
Ask the Vet About Lymphoma (Lymphosarcoma) in Dogs and Cats
MichaelDym, V.M.D.
Michael Dym, V.M.D.
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
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As a practicing veterinarian, Dr. Dym has over 19 years of experience and dedication to enhancing the overall health and well-being of pets. His commitment and passion for pet health continuously drives him to learn more about the art and science of homeopathy through ongoing training and education.

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Date: Jan 19, 2018
Category: Lymphoma
Pet Type: Dog
Topic: IBD vs. Lymphoma - Endoscpoic diagnosis

Question:We are planning to do an endoscopy tomorrow morning for diagnosis. The cost between an upper only w/ 2 biopsies and upper/lower endoscopy w/ 4 biopsies is significant. Is it necessary to have both an upper/lower endoscopy to diagnose lymphoma vs. IBD? Or is it possible do to only an upper Endoscopy to diagnose? What would the benefits be of doing an upper/lower endoscopy?

Answer:I would really need to know her clinical signs to properly advise you. Sometimes their clinical signs will be different with upper and lower GI disease. It also depends on what her radiographs look like, which I can't see. Certainly, you will increase your odds with 4 biopsies.

Date: Aug 11, 2017
Category: Lymphoma
Pet Type: Dog
Topic: Diagnosis and treatment

Question:I took my dog to the vet for swollen glands, and he wasn't eating or drinking. They did a general exam by touch, and drew blood. By that they said he had lymphoma, and put him on a antibiotic, and prednisone, and advised me to re up the dose when I see he is not responding to it. The more I read, the more questions I have about his diagnosis, and what to look for. He's 11 years old, and other than the knots in his lower jaw/ upper throat, he seems relatively fine. It's been three weeks now, and I have no clue what I'm doing or what to watch for, but I have noticed the knots are seeming to harden, is this normal? Also should he need medicine for pain.?

Answer:Yes, lymphoma lymph nodes can enlarge and/or harden as the disease progresses. Lymphoma is a very aggressive form of cancer so work closely with your veterinarian, especially from here on. I tell my clients to watch their appetite. On prednisone, his appetite should be good, so when it starts to decrease, you will want to contact your veterinarian - that's when they will probably want you to increase his meds. Most lymphoma patients don't experience a lot of overt pain, especially early in the disease. The prednisone should help with most discomfort at this stage because it is anti-inflammatory. He may need stronger pain meds toward the end.

Date: Feb 12, 2017
Category: Lymphoma
Pet Type: Dog
Topic: Nausea

Question:My English springer spaniel "Buddie" was diagnosed with lymphoma 9 days ago. He is 13 1/2 yrs old. He is currently on prednisone 20mg bid. In another day he drops to 20mg once a day. I was given Tramadol 50mg every 12 hours if needed. He seems to be having nausea every few days. Looks dumpy, weak and won't eat each time. Can you recommend some medication to alleviate his nausea? He has been give 4-8 weeks.... it's considered advanced stage. Thank you

Answer:Consider adding Cerenia - it's a really good anti-nausea medication that you give once daily. Your veterinarian more than likely carries it - if they don't, we do, but you would need a prescription from them. The tramadol can upset his stomach, so depending on how much he weighs, work with your veterinarian to find a dosage that doesn't upset his stomach. There are other pain meds that his stomach may handle a little better if you can't find a dosage that doesn't upset his stomach. When he drops to once daily prednisone, his appetite may decrease even more, so let your veterinarian know if he really stops eating. With cancer patients, it's important for them to keep eating - preferably more than they did before they were diagnosed (but that's hard to do) because the cancer increases their metabolism. Here's a link to Cerenia if you want to read about it: http://www.1800petmeds.com/Cerenia-prod11268.html


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